ROLLING OUT THE NATIONAL BROADBAND NETWORK WITH ISUZU

The National Broadbank Network (NBN) is the largest technology project in Australian history, so completing the hard work involved in transporting and laying the cable that will provide the next step in internet connectivity and speed across the country requires businesses that are unafraid of major responsibility.

Neil Herbert is the co-founder of NDN Communications – one of the construction companies contracted to build theNBN in Victoria.

“I’ve had over 20 years of experience in the telecommunications industry, and we established NDN Communications two years ago due to the increasing workload we had laying cable for the NBN,” Neil said.

“We formed NDN from a collection of individual companies that previously worked for Telstra.”

The diversity and experience NDN offers has made it one of the leading companies facilitating the NBN rollout, so Neil has expanded his business to tackle all facets of the construction process.

To help complete the mammoth-sized project – and continue developing NDN’s capabilities – Neil purchased an Isuzu NPR 55-155 Premium Tradepack.

“We’re based in Heidelberg but we service everywhere in Victoria,” Neil said.

“We’re a diverse business that covers a variety of the rollout’s components.

“We bought the Tradepack because it’s great for hauling loads, and after the NBN’s completion we’re planning on staying within the industry.”

The NPR 55-155 Tradepack is rated at 5,500 kg GVM and the engine produces 114 kW @ 2,600 rpm and 419 Nm @ 1,600 – 2,600 rpm – enough load capacity and grunt to meet all of NDN’s requirements now, and in the future.

“I bought the Tradepack to haul up to three tonnes of cable at a time,” Neil said.

“But we also join the cable and complete the civil component as well, so we use the truck for just about everything.

“One of the main reasons we bought it was the truck’s mobility, it’s always useful in tight locations.

“Don, our driver, raves about the turning circle, it’s one of his favourite features.”

NDN uses the Tradepack to transport the endless amounts of shimmering blue cable that will provide Australia’s internet backbone.

Given the amount of Australian businesses that will one day rely on the NBN, NDN Communications’ labours today could lay the groundwork for a thousand thriving Australian businesses tomorrow.

Hauling around steel drums packed with cable could make for a rough ride, but the Premium Tradepack’s Automated Manual Transmission (AMT) – offering both fully automatic and clutchless manual transmission modes – ensures a smooth driving experience.

“Everyone’s happy with it,” Neil said. “We’ve all been very impressed. The cab’s comfortable, there’s heaps of room and it drives like a breeze.

“It’s much smoother to drive than the trucks I’ve owned in the past. When we were in the market, we test drove the competitors and far preferred Isuzu.

“It was obvious the Isuzus were better quality vehicles.”

All the trucks in Isuzu’s Ready to Work range come with factory-fitted bodies covered by Isuzu warranty, ensuring peace of mind and eliminating the body-builder waiting game.

The range also comes in a variety of wheelbases – with most models driveable on a standard car licence – guaranteeing maximum flexibility among a business’s driving fleet.

The Ready to Work range keeps the ambitious tradie in mind by offering a higher payload than an average utility, while remaining easy to drive and full of creature comforts. It’s no surprise then that Neil uses the Tradepack for a lot more than just the daily work.

“The Tradepack has one main driver but all of us take it home to do the gardening or work around the house,” Neil laughs.

“It’s easy to drive, we get a wide variety of use out of it and when we take the drums off we still have all that tray space, which makes the truck the most adaptable vehicle in our fleet.

“The rest of my vehicles are four-wheel drives and the truck stacks up against them really well.

“I’ve also got a couple of new utilities and I think the Tradepack’s got even more features than them,” Neil concluded.

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